Network of Establishing Teachers


PPTA's Network of Establishing Teachers (previously known as the YANT Network) is for teachers in their first ten years who are establishing themselves in the profession.  The network operates mainly by email and has the following goals:

-    To provide a support network for teachers in their first ten years at both a national and a regional level
-    To nurture activism among PPTA members
-    To support recruitment and retention initiatives

The national Establishing Teachers' Committee is elected at the Issues and Organising Seminar held at the beginning of each year from the regional representatives of the network who attend.


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NET Bulletin 21 September 2012 - Get active!

Bulletin for the Network of Establishing Teachers (NETs) 21 September 2012. The bulletin is published as an information update for teachers who are  members of the the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers' Association / Te Wehengarua (PPTA) and are in their first 10 years of teaching.

Come on, Get amongst it!

5 tips on getting active

So you've embarked on the wonderful and challenging journey of a career in teaching. I've seen it before - you started out with an energetic sparkle in your eye "“ feeling like you'd won the lottery, just by getting a job. But by this time of the year, you're feeling pretty knackered, a tad time-poor (with mounting reports, marking, exams, coaching, PLD, meetings, etc), and basically you've given up trying to keep a social life rolling.

Come on "“ if you're honest with me "“ the state of our public education system, workers' rights and industrial relations are the last things on your mind! In fact, even if you had the time - getting involved seems just a little too hard and those who are involved seem infinitely more experienced and informed. BUT, WAIT … before you sigh in agreement and skip on to your next email... getting "˜amongst it' is not as difficult or time-consuming as you may think - and luckily, we're here to guide you on the way:

1.    Get informed

That's right folks "“ come to Mahi Tika to learn about your collective agreement, keep your eyes peeled for education programming on TV, listen to the radio on your way to work if there's coverage of education policy or employment law, scan online media and blogs for issues that may affect teaching "“ and yes, go on, treat yourself "“ open that PPTA News magazine in your staffroom!

Link to PPTA webpage Mahi Tika webpage

2.    Get social

Use social media like Facebook and Twitter to stay in touch with your network and community and share your opinion.

Follow us on TwitterFollow PPTA and NETs
https://twitter.com/PPTA_NETs
Facebook iconFind NETs on Facebook

Share links to bloggers who articulate their viewpoint coherently and convincingly. By getting your "˜insider knowledge' about teaching out there, you can dispel the myths that are propagated by those outside the profession.  Or just hit "˜share' when you come across things like:

Link to external website Education rethink Facebook page

3.    Get vocal

Don't be shy, speak up - the only way to rebut misinformed ranting about a "˜failing' education system is to voice an alternative view. That's right, I'm going to say it (cringe!) "Think Global "“ Act Local". Write to the editor of your local paper, go to meetings in your community, put your hand up and give an opinion as a member of the teaching profession.

4.    Stand up

What's happening in your school? Do you go to your PPTA branch meetings? Do you talk to colleagues about issues? If a problem arises or you disagree with proposed changes, do you look for constructive ways to engage and resolve issues?

5.    Front up

Put your name forward to be an Establishing Teacher Representative - there are many ways you can join in and PPTA is always keen to support its new activists. Go to a conference, or  a regional meeting and raise an issue that matters to you. Get brave - we need you to be active - you are the union!

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Establishing Teachers' Committee Convenor
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Advisory Officer

 

NET Bulletin 29 August 2012 - Stress at work

Bulletin for the Network of Establishing Teachers (NETs) 29 August 2012. The bulletin is published as an information update for teachers who are  members of the the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers' Association / Te Wehengarua (PPTA) and are in their first 10 years of teaching.

How to deal with stress at work

Feeling overworked, constantly run-down, reluctant to take time out with friends, tired and grumpy, unable to sleep, unsupported, anxious about registration?

Stress is a normal part of life, but all too frequently, we come across dedicated professionals who are new to teaching and in a state of crisis. Struggling with a myriad of pressures including family responsibilities, heavy workloads, large classes, difficult students, uncertain tenure, lack of supervision, long commutes, financial problems and strained relationships "“ they begin to wonder: is teaching really the career for me?

But wait "“ before you dash off into the sunset and abandon a challenging but incredibly rewarding job, let's talk about how to deal with stress. Irrespective of whether the "˜stressors' actually originate in the workplace - the physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioural symptoms of stress can have a real impact on our ability to work. When people feel threatened or anxious, the limbic system of the brain is triggered in an intense and negative way known as "˜amygdala hijack' or the fight/flight threat response. So it is critical that stress is not left unmanaged as it can result in poor health, absenteeism, bullying and low morale.

Like any other hazard, workplace stress needs to be identified; eliminated, and/or minimized by your employer. PPTA encourages schools to engage proactively to support individuals showing signs of distress and ensure they are in a safe and healthy work environment. As good employees, we need to be responsive and communicative by talking to our employer about excessive workload and bullying. Easier said than done though - right? Everyone is busy and the school community is demanding "top performers" to deliver "5-star service". Indeed, sometimes finding the time or courage to communicate how we are coping feels impossible. So what can you do?

Get access to free workplace counselling

Yes, that's right "“ free counselling is available for most NZ teachers. PPTA encourages schools to subscribe to the Employee Assistance Program ("˜EAP') as part of their Health and Safety strategy. This program gives staff access to three sessions of free confidential counselling and advice each year that is either face-to-face, via telephone, or online chat.  EAP registered practitioners have proved invaluable in assisting teachers throughout the country to work through relationship breakdowns, alcohol and drug issues, workplace bullying, family issues, depression, financial stress and personal trauma.

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