Network of Establishing Teachers


PPTA's Network of Establishing Teachers (previously known as the YANT Network) is for teachers in their first ten years who are establishing themselves in the profession.  The network operates mainly by email and has the following goals:

-    To provide a support network for teachers in their first ten years at both a national and a regional level
-    To nurture activism among PPTA members
-    To support recruitment and retention initiatives

The national Establishing Teachers' Committee is elected at the Issues and Organising Seminar held at the beginning of each year from the regional representatives of the network who attend.


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Maximum teaching hours - what new teachers need to know

What new teachers need to know contains excerpts from the PPTA Beginning teachers' handbook - a quick reference for new and beginning teachers in New Zealand secondary schools.  This page tells you what you need to know about your maximum teaching hours.

BeginningTeachersHandbook coverMaximum teaching hours

No full-time first-year teacher should be teaching more than 15 hours per week (an average of three hours per day).

Second year full-time teachers should be teaching no more than 17.5 hours per week (an average of 3.5 hours per day).

Part-time first-year teachers who are employed for 12.5 (an average of 2.5 hours per day) or more hours per week are entitled to an additional 2.5 hours paid non-contact time (an average of half an hour per day). This should be either part of their 12.5 hours or an extra paid 2.5 hours non-teaching time.

Link to PPTA webpage Sections 5.2.2 and 5.2.3(a) of the Secondary Teachers' Collective Agreement (STCA) states that no teacher shall be timetabled to teach more than 20 hours per week.

Link to PPTA webpage Clause 3.8 of the STCA gives a further five hours non-contact time for first year teachers (0.2 FTTE) and 2.5 hours (0.1 FTTE) for second year teachers in full-time positions.

Link to PPTA webpage Sub-section 4.2 of the Area School Teachers' Collective Agreement (ASTCA) provides non-contact time for secondary teachers in area schools.

Timetabling

Schools often use complicated time-tabling systems such as a six-day, 30-hour time table.

When applying STCA provisions, you need to use the average daily time to work out the maximum teaching time over the cycle.

Thus, in a six-day timetable:
- a first-year teacher should be teaching no more than 18 hours (6 x 3.0 hours).
- a second-year teacher would be teaching no more than 21 hours (6 x 3.5).
- a first-year part-time teacher employed for 15 hours (6 x 2.5) or more should be getting three hours non-contact (6 x 0.5) either as part of their 15 hours or in addition to them.

Duty, form time, and meetings are not considered contact time unless actual teaching of students takes place.

Part three of the STCA details other time allowances that may be of interest to beginning teachers. For example, the one hour per week heads of department have for each first- and second-year teacher in their department.

Overseas teachers new to New Zealand schools receive an allowance of 0.1 FTTE (2.5 hours) per week for the school to use in consultation with them for a maximum of two terms.

Permanent management units (PMUs) attract an allowance of one hour per unit up to a maximum of three hours per week.

Pay scales - what new teachers need to know

What new teachers need to know contains excerpts from the PPTA Beginning teachers' handbook - a quick reference for new and beginning teachers in New Zealand secondary schools.  This page tells you what you need to know about your pay scales.

BeginningTeachersHandbook coverPay / Salary scales

Most first-year teachers with a subject specialist bachelor degree and graduate diploma in teaching start on step 3 (G3+E) which equates to a salary of $47,400 per year.

Link to PPTA webpage Section 4.1 of the Secondary Teachers' Collective Agreement (STCA) and

Link to PPTA webpage Section 3.1 of the Area School Teachers' Collective Agreement (ASTCA)

lists the pay scales for teachers in state and state integrated schools. At first glance this table may appear complicated, as a lot of information is presented in a small space.

Decoding the salary scale - trained teachers

What new teachers need to know - pay scales new zealand secondary schools

E Entry step for qualifications group.
M Maximum step for qualifications group.

The "˜G' notations relate to the entry points and qualifications maxima for teachers who have a qualification defined below. The qualification groups for salary purposes are:
G1 Level 5 qualification.
G2 Level 6 qualification.
G3 Level 7 qualification "” eg Bachelor of Education.
G3+ Level 7 subject/specialist qualification and recognised teaching qualification.
(G3+ includes conjoint subject/specialist and teaching qualifications).
G4 Level 8 qualification (or two level 7 subject/specialist qualifications).
G5 Level 9 and 10 qualifications "“ Masters or PhD.
Units: Rate effective 13 January 2013 = $4,000

A secondary teacher's starting salary may be higher if they have work experience related to their position or a higher degree. In fact, some first-year teachers have started at the top of the basic scale due to their type of degree and previous work experience.

Read more about Qualifications Assessment

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