Network of Establishing Teachers


PPTA's Network of Establishing Teachers (previously known as the YANT Network) is for teachers in their first ten years who are establishing themselves in the profession.  The network operates mainly by email and has the following goals:

-    To provide a support network for teachers in their first ten years at both a national and a regional level
-    To nurture activism among PPTA members
-    To support recruitment and retention initiatives

The national Establishing Teachers' Committee is elected at the Issues and Organising Seminar held at the beginning of each year from the regional representatives of the network who attend.


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NET Bulletin 18 Oct 2012 - Career pathways

Bulletin for the Network of Establishing Teachers (NETs) 18 October 2012. The bulletin is published as an information update for teachers who are  members of the the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers' Association / Te Wehengarua (PPTA) and are in their first 10 years of teaching.

Career pathways for teachers

One of the great things about the teaching profession is that there is a big wide world of education out there and plenty of opportunities to put your skills to use in different ways.

When beginning your career though, it's sometimes hard to get your head above the parapet and see what these options are. Below are some of the options that you could consider.

In-school pathways

Schools are obliged to advertise these roles in the Education Gazette when a position becomes vacant, but sometimes there are in-school processes when roles like dean are on a cycle, and often applications are asked for by the principal in September or October of the year before it starts.

Curriculum leadership

You could try taking on leadership roles in a curriculum area "“ from the teacher-in-charge role which typically is in a smaller subject area like physics or media studies, where you might be the only teacher, to the head of department job, which usually involves leading a team of teachers.

What you need: to be passionate and knowledgeable about your subject area, and willing and able to manage other staff.

Responsibilities: managing your subject area's curriculum and assessment, crunching data, performance management and development for your staff, some school-wide responsibilities too.

Rewards: typically 1-4 management units (which are worth $4000 a year and come with one hour a week release time) and/or 1-2 middle management allowances (which are worth $1000 a year).

Pastoral leadership

Another route that many teachers take, sometimes in conjunction with curriculum leadership, is in connection with the pastoral side of the school, i.e. student welfare and behaviour management. This is sometimes called "˜deaning' or being a "˜tutor teacher' or the like.

What you need: to be interested in student well-being and properly understand the school culture and practices about student management.   Typically, if you enjoy and are good at being a form/tutor teacher this will be a role that suits you.

Responsibilities: typically the pastoral care of a large group of students, a year-group or house. You will work with other staff and people outside school, sometimes like the police or CYFS, and develop and implement individual education plans (IEPs) for students who need support.

Rewards: typically 1-3 management units and/or 1-2 MMAs.

Other specialist roles in school

These sorts of roles typically take you out of the classroom either entirely (in the case of a guidance counsellor) or a little, in the case of a specialist classroom teacher. For guidance counsellors, who also need to be registered teachers, there is specialist training that you will undertake, sometimes after you have been appointed to the position. The skills required and rewards for these roles vary greatly.

Senior leadership

These days it is increasingly common for highly-motivated and talented teachers to progress quickly into senior leadership roles, though you often need to be willing to move around a lot and to parts of the country that are more difficult to staff. Assistant-principal, deputy-principal and even principal jobs are now sometimes filled by teachers who have barely reached the top of the base scale.
Undertaking further study or participating in the National Aspiring Principals Programme can assist with this sort of thing. These jobs can be well remunerated and very rewarding, but are generally stressful and massively time-consuming.

NET Bulletin 21 September 2012 - Get active!

Bulletin for the Network of Establishing Teachers (NETs) 21 September 2012. The bulletin is published as an information update for teachers who are  members of the the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers' Association / Te Wehengarua (PPTA) and are in their first 10 years of teaching.

Come on, Get amongst it!

5 tips on getting active

So you've embarked on the wonderful and challenging journey of a career in teaching. I've seen it before - you started out with an energetic sparkle in your eye "“ feeling like you'd won the lottery, just by getting a job. But by this time of the year, you're feeling pretty knackered, a tad time-poor (with mounting reports, marking, exams, coaching, PLD, meetings, etc), and basically you've given up trying to keep a social life rolling.

Come on "“ if you're honest with me "“ the state of our public education system, workers' rights and industrial relations are the last things on your mind! In fact, even if you had the time - getting involved seems just a little too hard and those who are involved seem infinitely more experienced and informed. BUT, WAIT … before you sigh in agreement and skip on to your next email... getting "˜amongst it' is not as difficult or time-consuming as you may think - and luckily, we're here to guide you on the way:

1.    Get informed

That's right folks "“ come to Mahi Tika to learn about your collective agreement, keep your eyes peeled for education programming on TV, listen to the radio on your way to work if there's coverage of education policy or employment law, scan online media and blogs for issues that may affect teaching "“ and yes, go on, treat yourself "“ open that PPTA News magazine in your staffroom!

Link to PPTA webpage Mahi Tika webpage

2.    Get social

Use social media like Facebook and Twitter to stay in touch with your network and community and share your opinion.

Follow us on TwitterFollow PPTA and NETs
https://twitter.com/PPTA_NETs
Facebook iconFind NETs on Facebook

Share links to bloggers who articulate their viewpoint coherently and convincingly. By getting your "˜insider knowledge' about teaching out there, you can dispel the myths that are propagated by those outside the profession.  Or just hit "˜share' when you come across things like:

Link to external website Education rethink Facebook page

3.    Get vocal

Don't be shy, speak up - the only way to rebut misinformed ranting about a "˜failing' education system is to voice an alternative view. That's right, I'm going to say it (cringe!) "Think Global "“ Act Local". Write to the editor of your local paper, go to meetings in your community, put your hand up and give an opinion as a member of the teaching profession.

4.    Stand up

What's happening in your school? Do you go to your PPTA branch meetings? Do you talk to colleagues about issues? If a problem arises or you disagree with proposed changes, do you look for constructive ways to engage and resolve issues?

5.    Front up

Put your name forward to be an Establishing Teacher Representative - there are many ways you can join in and PPTA is always keen to support its new activists. Go to a conference, or  a regional meeting and raise an issue that matters to you. Get brave - we need you to be active - you are the union!

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Establishing Teachers' Committee Convenor
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Advisory Officer

 

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