Media

Recent PPTA press/media releases.

Link to PPTA webpage Posters and archived releases

Banks verdict gives government chance to walk away from charter schools

6 June 2014


The guilty verdict handed down against former Act leader John Banks means Hekia Parata can immediately put a stop to further rounds of charter schools.

PPTA President Angela Roberts said the schools were introduced by sleight of hand in the National-Act coalition deal as the price for Banks’ support.

“Now that Banks is history, the government doesn’t owe him a thing and should call a halt to this unwelcome experiment.”

The second round of applications is underway at the moment. Nineteen have already been received, including from fringe religious organisations, existing private schools, and a US based charter school chain, Roberts said.

“If the government doesn’t stop this round in its tracks, it gives the public a clear indication this is a National Party policy as much as an Act one, and they will be held to account for that come election time,” she said.

“Surveys consistently show that parents want qualified, registered, teachers, and schools to be transparent in their operation and funding - which charters aren’t.”

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IES: consultation, collaboration, good for schools

3 June 2014

The government’s $359 million Investing in Educational Success (IES) program has been a positive example of sector collaboration, says PPTA president Angela Roberts.

Roberts welcomes today’s release of the working group report on the initiative which will see schools across the country collaborating rather than competing.

From PPTA’s point of view the consultation over IES was comprehensive, robust and genuine, Roberts said.

“We stepped up to the challenge and engaged as fully as it is possible to do.”

The sector had worked hard together to find pragmatic answers and there had been significant movement from the originally unacceptable cabinet paper, Roberts said.

“You know it’s collaboration when it’s hard work – and this was really hard work.”

“We feel cabinet has heard us,” she said.

That did not mean there would not be further work to be done or challenges in the future. Details of the new provisions would be a matter of collective bargaining, Roberts said.

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Pink shirts and new guidelines – schools take a stand against bullying

21 May 2014

Schools will be turning pink this Friday to take a stand against bullying – and now they have a new set of guidelines to back them up.

The Pink Shirt Day bullying awareness campaign will brighten up schools and workplaces on Friday 23 May with the message “Speak Up, Stand Together, Stop Bullying.”

At the same time the Bullying Prevention Advisory Group (BPAG) is releasing a practical guide to support principals, teachers, staff and parents to address bullying in schools.

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Teaching profession steps up – says no to EDUCANZ

7 May 2014

Hundreds of passionate secondary teachers will make time this month to ensure the government hears the voice of the profession.

Starting today submissions will be heard against the Education Amendment Bill (No 2) after teachers at paid union meetings (PUMs) throughout the country gave it a resounding no.

Not only did submissions against the bill - which threatens to undermine the teaching profession - pour in after the PUMs but the majority of teachers chose to present theirs to the Education and Science select committee in person.

PPTA president Angela Roberts, who will be presenting the association’s own submission in Wellington this morning said the response showed how deeply concerned members were about their profession.

“Those that can’t attend a hearing in person will be calling in from their schools or taking part in video conferences,” she said.

The bill dismantles the New Zealand Teachers Council and replaces it with a new body – the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand (EDUCANZ).

EDUCANZ has a range of overly ambitious functions that stray into territory outside the domain of a registration body.

PPTA was supportive of the bill’s proposals to strengthen the discipline and competence functions of the council but felt these were being threatened by its more wide-ranging plans, Roberts said.

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Novopay - Time for Joyce to put his money where his mouth is

25 March 2014

In March 2013 minister for Novopay Steven Joyce dropped money into schools to tide them over while their bungled pay system was being fixed.

More than a year later, according to a PPTA survey, the system is still impacting on teachers’ lives at an unacceptable level.

PPTA president Angela Roberts challenged Joyce to put his money where his mouth is.

“If this mess is as good as it gets – and that’s definitely not good enough- then it is time for an audit of the real cost burden this private company (Talent2) has put on schools.

“If it is still unstable then the government should be providing another cash injection to help schools survive,” she said.

Between 27 February and 7 March PPTA surveyed members on the impacts of the school payroll failures.

The survey, which was answered by 2454 members from 479 different schools, revealed that 25% of respondents had problems with their pay, with 22.8% being paid incorrectly.

“This means the scale of the problem is still large, and much larger than the figures being quoted by government,” Roberts said.

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Paid union meetings called over EDUCANZ attack on profession


PPTA members will be holding paid union meetings (PUMs) next month as preparation for making submissions on legislation that attacks the teaching profession.

The Education Amendment Bill (No 2), which the government clearly intends to push through before the election, establishes a new professional body for teachers - the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand (EDUCANZ).

EDUCANZ, which is set to replace the current New Zealand Teachers Council (NZTC), purports to be about “raising the status of the profession” but the reality is very different, PPTA president Angela Roberts says.

“It’s clear from the bill that the intention isn’t so much to ‘raise the status of teaching’ as to remove professional autonomy and bring teachers firmly under the control of politicians,” she said.

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